NGC 2264

  • Telescope: Askar 200 mm f/4 telephoto lens
  • Camera: ASI 294 MC Pro, gain 120, -15C°, Optolong L-PRO filter
  • Mount: Ioptron Sky Guider PRO autoguided
  • Integration: 50 x 180 sec with dithering (60 bias, 40 dark, 40 flat)
  • Date, Location, Temp/Software: March 2022, Livorno (Italy), 8°C/PixInsight/PhotoShop
  • Click the image for 1920×1080 resolution

NGC 2264. NGC 2264 is the designation number of the New General Catalogue that identifies two astronomical objects as a single object: the Cone Nebula, and the Christmas Tree Cluster. Two other objects are within this designation but not officially included, the Snowflake Cluster, and the Fox Fur Nebula. The Cone Nebula is an H II region in the constellation of Monoceros. It was discovered by William Herschel on December 26, 1785, at which time he designated it H V.27. The nebula is located about 830 parsecs or 2,700 light-years away from Earth. The Cone Nebula forms part of the nebulosity surrounding the Christmas Tree Cluster. The designation of NGC 2264 in the New General Catalogue refers to both objects and not the nebula alone. The cone’s shape comes from a dark absorption nebula consisting of cold molecular hydrogen and dust in front of a faint emission nebula containing hydrogen ionized by S Monocerotis, the brightest star of NGC 2264. The faint nebula is approximately seven light-years long (with an apparent length of 10 arcminutes), and is 2,700 light-years away from Earth. The Christmas Tree Cluster is a collection of sparking bluish-white stars. It is above a cone-shaped cloud of gas in the direction of the constellation Monoceros the Unicorn.

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Seagull Nebula

  • Telescope: Askar 200 mm f/4 telephoto lens
  • Camera: ASI 294 MC Pro, gain 120, -15C°, Optolong L-PRO filter
  • Mount: Ioptron Sky Guider PRO autoguided
  • Integration: 50 x 180 sec with dithering (60 bias, 40 dark, 40 flat)
  • Date, Location, Temp/Software: March 2022, Livorno (Italy), 5°C/PixInsight/PhotoShop
  • Click the image for 1920×1080 resolution

IC 2177. IC 2177 is a region of nebulosity that lies along the border between the constellations Monoceros and Canis Major. It is a roughly circular H II region centered on the Be star HD 53367. This nebula was discovered by Welsh amateur astronomer Isaac Roberts and was described by him as “pretty bright, extremely large, irregularly round, very diffuse.” The name Seagull Nebula is sometimes applied by amateur astronomers to this emission region, although it more properly includes the neighboring regions of star clusters, dust clouds and reflection nebulae. This latter region includes the open clusters NGC 2335 and NGC 2343. NGC 2327 is located in IC 2177. It is also known as the Seagull’s Head, due to its larger presence in the Seagull nebula.

Rosette nebula

  • Telescope: Askar 200mm f/4 telephoto lens
  • Camera: ASI 294 MC Pro, gain 120, -15C°, Optolong L-PRO filter
  • Mount: Ioptron Sky Guider PRO autoguided
  • Integration: 50 x 180 sec with dithering (60 bias, 40 dark, 40 flat)
  • Date, Location, Temp/Software: February 2021, Livorno (Italy), 9°C/PixInsight/PhotoShop
  • Click the image for 1920×1080 resolution

Rosette nebula.The Rosette Nebula (also known as Caldwell 49) is an H II region located near one end of a giant molecular cloud in the Monoceros region of the Milky Way Galaxy. The open cluster NGC 2244 (Caldwell 50) is closely associated with the nebulosity, the stars of the cluster having been formed from the nebula’s matter. The cluster and nebula lie at a distance of 5,000 light-years from Earth and measure roughly 130 light years in diameter. The radiation from the young stars excites the atoms in the nebula, causing them to emit radiation themselves producing the emission nebula we see. The mass of the nebula is estimated to be around 10,000 solar masses.

Horsehead and Flame nebula

  • Telescope: Askar 200mm f/4 telephoto lens
  • Camera: ASI 294 MC Pro, gain 120, -15C°, Optolong L-PRO filter
  • Mount: Ioptron Sky Guider PRO autoguided
  • Integration: 60 x 180 sec with dithering (60 bias, 40 dark, 40 flat)
  • Date, Location, Temp/Software: February 2021, Livorno (Italy), 6°C/PixInsight/PhotoShop
  • Click the image for 1920×1080 resolution

Horsehead and Flame nebula.

M42

  • Telescope: Askar 200mm f/4 telephoto lens
  • Camera: ASI 294 MC Pro, gain 120, -15C°, Optolong L-PRO filter
  • Mount: Ioptron Sky Guider PRO autoguided
  • Integration: 63 x 180 sec, 30 x 30 sec, with dithering (60 bias, 40 dark, 40 flat)
  • Date, Location, Temp/Software: January 2021, Livorno (Italy), 7°C/PixInsight/PhotoShop
  • Click the image for 1920×1080 resolution

M42.

M45

  • Telescope: Askar 200mm f/4 telephoto lens
  • Camera: ASI 294 MC Pro, gain 120, -10C°, Optolong L-PRO filter
  • Mount: Ioptron Sky Guider PRO autoguided
  • Integration: 59 x 180 sec, with dithering (40 bias, 40 dark, 40 flat)
  • Date, Location, Temp/Software: December 2021, Livorno (Italy), 12°C/PixInsight/PhotoShop
  • Click the image for 1920×1080 resolution

M45. The Pleiades also known as The Seven Sisters, Messier 45, and other names by different cultures, is an asterism and an open star cluster containing middle-aged, hot B-type stars in the north-west of the constellation Taurus. It is among the star clusters nearest to Earth, it is the nearest Messier object to Earth, and is the cluster most obvious to the naked eye in the night sky. The cluster is dominated by hot blue and luminous stars that have formed within the last 100 million years. Reflection nebulae around the brightest stars were once thought to be left over material from their formation, but are now considered likely to be an unrelated dust cloud in the interstellar medium through which the stars are currently passing. Astronomers estimate that the cluster will survive for about another 250 million years, after which it will disperse due to gravitational interactions with its galactic neighborhood.

Seagull Nebula

Image16

  • Telescope: Canon EF 135mm f/2L USM telephoto lens (f/2.8 stopped)
  • Camera: modified Canon 1300D (super UV-IR cut), 800 iso, RAW mode, Optolong L-PRO filter
  • Mount: Ioptron Sky Guider PRO autoguided
  • Integration: 38 x 120 sec (20 bias, 5 dark, 30 flat) with dithering
  • Date, Location, Temp/Software: March 2021, Livorno (Italy), 12°C/PixInsight/PhotoShop
  • Click the image for 1920×1080 resolution

IC 2177. IC 2177 is a region of nebulosity that lies along the border between the constellations Monoceros and Canis Major. It is a roughly circular H II region centered on the Be star HD 53367. This nebula was discovered by Welsh amateur astronomer Isaac Roberts and was described by him as “pretty bright, extremely large, irregularly round, very diffuse.” The name Seagull Nebula is sometimes applied by amateur astronomers to this emission region, although it more properly includes the neighboring regions of star clusters, dust clouds and reflection nebulae. This latter region includes the open clusters NGC 2335 and NGC 2343. NGC 2327 is located in IC 2177. It is also known as the Seagull’s Head, due to its larger presence in the Seagull nebula.

Rosette nebula

Image11 copia

  • Telescope: Canon EF 135mm f/2L USM telephoto lens (f/2.8 stopped)
  • Camera: modified Canon 1300D (super UV-IR cut), 800 iso, RAW mode, Optolong L-PRO filter
  • Mount: Ioptron Sky Guider PRO autoguided
  • Integration: 40 x 120 sec (20 bias, 5 dark, 30 flat) with dithering
  • Date, Location, Temp/Software: March 2021, Livorno (Italy), 10°C/PixInsight/PhotoShop
  • Click the image for 1920×1080 resolution

Rosette nebula. _

Orion, Running Man, Horsehead and Flame Nebula (2)

Image16 copia

  • Telescope: Canon EF 135mm f/2L USM telephoto lens (f/3.5 stopped)
  • Camera: modified Canon 1300D (super UV-IR cut), 800 iso, RAW mode, Optolong L-PRO filter
  • Mount: Ioptron Sky Guider PRO autoguided
  • Integration: 40 x 120 sec (20 bias, 5 dark, 30 flat), 20 x 5 sec (20 flat) for Orion nebula core (with dithering)
  • Date, Location, Temp/Software: January 2021, Livorno (Italy), 4°C/PixInsight/PhotoShop
  • Click the image for 1920×1080 resolution

Orion, Running Man, Horsehead and Flame Nebula. _

M31, M32 and M110 galaxies in Andromeda

  • Telescope: Canon EF 135mm f/2L USM telephoto lens (f/4 stopped)
  • Camera: modified Canon 1300D (super UV-IR cut) , 800 iso, RAW mode, Optolong L-PRO filter
  • Mount: Astrotrac with polar scope
  • Integration: 40 x 120 sec, (30 bias, 5 dark, 30 flat)
  • Date, Location, Temp/Software: Dicember 2020, Livorno (Italy), 11°C/ PixInsight, PhotoShop
  • Click the image for 1920×1080 resolution

The Andromeda Galaxy is a spiral galaxy approximately 2.5 million light-years from Earth in the Andromeda constellation. Also known as Messier 31, M31, or NGC 224, it is often referred to as the Great Andromeda Nebula in older texts. The Andromeda Galaxy is the nearest spiral galaxy to our Milky Way galaxy, but not the closest galaxy overall. It gets its name from the area of the sky in which it appears, the constellation of Andromeda, which was named after the mythological princess Andromeda. The Andromeda Galaxy is the largest galaxy of the Local Group, which also contains the Milky Way, the Triangulum Galaxy, and about 30 other smaller galaxies. Although the largest, the Andromeda Galaxy may not be the most massive, as recent findings suggest that the Milky Way contains more dark matter and could be the most massive in the grouping (Wikipedia).