Seagull Nebula

IC1318_BIS copia3

  • Telescope: Canon EF 135mm f/2L USM telephoto lens (f/2.8 stopped)
  • Camera: modified Canon 1300D (super UV-IR cut), 800 iso, RAW mode, Optolong L-PRO filter
  • Mount: Ioptron Sky Guider PRO autoguided
  • Integration: 38 x 120 sec (20 bias, 5 dark, 30 flat) with dithering
  • Date, Location, Temp/Software: March 2021, Livorno (Italy), 12°C/PixInsight/PhotoShop
  • Click the image for 1920×1080 resolution

IC 2177. IC 2177 is a region of nebulosity that lies along the border between the constellations Monoceros and Canis Major. It is a roughly circular H II region centered on the Be star HD 53367. This nebula was discovered by Welsh amateur astronomer Isaac Roberts and was described by him as “pretty bright, extremely large, irregularly round, very diffuse.” The name Seagull Nebula is sometimes applied by amateur astronomers to this emission region, although it more properly includes the neighboring regions of star clusters, dust clouds and reflection nebulae. This latter region includes the open clusters NGC 2335 and NGC 2343. NGC 2327 is located in IC 2177. It is also known as the Seagull’s Head, due to its larger presence in the Seagull nebula.

Rosette nebula

def9

  • Telescope: Canon EF 135mm f/2L USM telephoto lens (f/2.8 stopped)
  • Camera: modified Canon 1300D (super UV-IR cut), 800 iso, RAW mode, Optolong L-PRO filter
  • Mount: Ioptron Sky Guider PRO autoguided
  • Integration: 40 x 120 sec (20 bias, 5 dark, 30 flat) with dithering
  • Date, Location, Temp/Software: March 2021, Livorno (Italy), 10°C/PixInsight/PhotoShop
  • Click the image for 1920×1080 resolution

Rosette nebula. _

Orion, Running Man, Horsehead and Flame Nebula (2)

orion-horse-nebulae_5 3

  • Telescope: Canon EF 135mm f/2L USM telephoto lens (f/3.5 stopped)
  • Camera: modified Canon 1300D (super UV-IR cut), 800 iso, RAW mode, Optolong L-PRO filter
  • Mount: Ioptron Sky Guider PRO autoguided
  • Integration: 40 x 120 sec (20 bias, 5 dark, 30 flat), 20 x 5 sec (20 flat) for Orion nebula core (with dithering)
  • Date, Location, Temp/Software: January 2021, Livorno (Italy), 4°C/PixInsight/PhotoShop
  • Click the image for 1920×1080 resolution

Orion, Running Man, Horsehead and Flame Nebula. _

M31, M32 and M110 galaxies in Andromeda

  • Telescope: Canon EF 135mm f/2L USM telephoto lens (f/4 stopped)
  • Camera: modified Canon 1300D (super UV-IR cut) , 800 iso, RAW mode, Optolong L-PRO filter
  • Mount: Astrotrac with polar scope
  • Integration: 40 x 120 sec, (30 bias, 5 dark, 30 flat)
  • Date, Location, Temp/Software: Dicember 2020, Livorno (Italy), 11°C/ PixInsight, PhotoShop
  • Click the image for 1920×1080 resolution

The Andromeda Galaxy is a spiral galaxy approximately 2.5 million light-years from Earth in the Andromeda constellation. Also known as Messier 31, M31, or NGC 224, it is often referred to as the Great Andromeda Nebula in older texts. The Andromeda Galaxy is the nearest spiral galaxy to our Milky Way galaxy, but not the closest galaxy overall. It gets its name from the area of the sky in which it appears, the constellation of Andromeda, which was named after the mythological princess Andromeda. The Andromeda Galaxy is the largest galaxy of the Local Group, which also contains the Milky Way, the Triangulum Galaxy, and about 30 other smaller galaxies. Although the largest, the Andromeda Galaxy may not be the most massive, as recent findings suggest that the Milky Way contains more dark matter and could be the most massive in the grouping (Wikipedia).

Nebulosity around Gamma Cygni in Cygnus

  • Telescope: Canon EF 135mm f/2L USM telephoto lens (f/2.8 stopped)
  • Camera: Baader modified Canon 400D, 800 iso, RAW mode
  • Mount: Astrotrac with polar scope
  • Integration: 30 x 120 sec, (21 bias, 21 dark, 21 flat)
  • Date, Location, Temp/Software: July 2012, Grosseto (Italy), 19°C/MaxIm-DL, PixInsight, PhotoShop
  • Click HERE for solved map

Gamma Cygni (γ Cyg) is the Bayer designation for a star in the northern constellation Cygnus, forming the intersection of an asterism of five stars called the Northern Cross. It has the traditional name Sadr (also spelled Sadir or Sador). With an apparent visual magnitude of 2.23, this is among the brighter stars visible in the night sky. Parallax measurements give a distance estimate of 1,800 light years (560 parsecs), with a 15% margin of error. The stellar classification of this star is F8 Iab, indicating that it has reached the supergiant stage of its stellar evolution. Since 1943, the spectrum of this star has served as one of the stable anchor points by which other stars are classified. Compared to the Sun this is an enormous star, with 12 times the Sun’s mass and about 150 times the Sun’s radius.It is emitting over 33,000 as much energy as the Sun, at an effective temperature of 6,100 K in its outer envelope. This temperature is what gives the star the characteristic yellow-white hue of an F-type star. Massive stars such as this consume their nuclear fuel much more rapidly than the Sun, so the estimated age of this star is only about 12 million years old (Wikipedia).

The Tulip nebula in Cygnus (2)

  • Telescope: Canon EF 135mm f/2L USM telephoto lens (f/2.8 stopped)
  • Camera: Baader modified Canon 400D, 800 iso, RAW mode
  • Mount: Astrotrac with polar scope
  • Integration: 30 x 120 sec, (21 bias, 21 dark, 21 flat)
  • Date, Location, Temp/Software: August 2012, Grosseto (Italy), 21°C/MaxIm-DL, PixInsight, PhotoShop
  • Click HERE for solved map
  • Click the image for 1920×1080 resolution

The Tulip nebula (SH2-101).  This photo was taken on august 2012 by using a filter modified Canon Eos 400D with EF 135 mm lens at f/2.8 on Astrotrac. The photo is the sum of 30 frames, each of 2 minutes. Sharpless 101 (Sh2-101) is a H II region emission nebula located in the constellation Cygnus. It is sometimes also called the Tulip Nebula because it appears to resemble the outline of a tulip when imaged photographically. It was catalogued by astronomer Stewart Sharpless in his 1959 catalog of nebulae. It lies at a distance of about 6,000 light-years (5.7×1016 km; 3.5×1016 mi) from Earth. Sh2-101, at least in the field seen from earth, is in close proximity to microquasar Cygnus X-1, site of one of the first suspected black holes. Cygnus X-1 is the bright star near the bottom right corner of the image presented here.

The inner region of the Milk Way with M16 (Eagle nebula) and M17 (Omega nebula)

Trifid_2 copia

  • Telescope: Canon EF 135mm f/2L USM telephoto lens (f/2.8 stopped)
  • Camera: Baader modified Canon 400D, 800 iso, RAW mode, CLS filter
  • Mount: Astrotrac with polar scope
  • Integration: 38 x 120 sec, (25 bias, 25 dark, 25 flat)
  • Date, Location, Temp/Software: August 2019, Livorno (Italy), 24°C/MaxIm-DL, PixInsight, PhotoShop
  • Click the image for 1920×1080 resolution

The inner region of the Milk Way. This photo was taken on august 2019 by using a filter modified Canon Eos 400D with EF 135 mm lens at f/2.8 on Astrotrac. The photo is the sum of 38 frames, each of 2 minutes. M16, the Eagle nebula, is part of a diffuse emission nebula, or H II region, which is catalogued as IC 4703. This region of active current star formation is about 7000 light-years distant. A spire of gas that can be seen coming off the nebula in the northeastern part is approximately 9.5 light-years or about 90 trillion kilometers long. The cluster associated with the nebula has approximately 8100 stars, which are mostly concentrated in a gap in the molecular cloud to the north-west of the Pillars.[6] The brightest star (HD 168076) has an apparent magnitude of +8.24, easily visible with good binoculars. It is actually a binary star formed of an O3.5V star plus an O7.5V companion. This star has a mass of roughly 80 solar masses, and a luminosity up to 1 million times that of the Sun. The cluster’s age has been estimated to be 1–2 million years. M17, the Omega nebula is between 5,000 and 6,000 light-years from Earth and it spans some 15 light-years in diameter. The cloud of interstellar matter of which this nebula is a part is roughly 40 light-years in diameter and has a mass of 30,000 solar masses. The total mass of the Omega Nebula is an estimated 800 solar masses. It is considered one of the brightest and most massive star-forming regions of our galaxy. Its local geometry is similar to the Orion Nebula except that it is viewed edge-on rather than face-on.

Barnard 142-143 in Aquila (2)

barnard 142 copia 3

  • Telescope: Canon EF 135mm f/2L USM telephoto lens (f/2.8 stopped)
  • Camera: Baader modified Canon 400D, 800 iso, RAW mode, Optolong PRO filter
  • Mount: Astrotrac with polar scope
  • Integration: 34 x 120 sec, (25 bias, 25 dark, 25 flat)
  • Date, Location, Temp/Software: September 2020, Livorno (Italy), 26°C/PixInsight, PhotoShop
  • Click the image for 1920×1080 resolution

Barnard 142-143. The “E” or “Barnard’s E” Nebula (officially designated as Barnard 142 and 143) is a pair of dark nebula in the Aquila constellation. It is a well-defined dark area on a background of Milky Way consisting of countless stars of all magnitudes. Its size is about that of the full moon, or roughly 0.5 degrees, and its distance from earth is estimated at about 2,000 light years.

The Veil nebular complex in Cygnus (2)

veil-nebula_2

  • Telescope: Canon EF 135mm f/2L USM telephoto lens (f/2.8 stopped)
  • Camera: Baader modified Canon 400D, 800 iso, RAW mode, Optolong PRO filter
  • Mount: Astrotrac with polar scope
  • Integration: 47 x 120 sec, (21 bias, 21 dark, 21 flat)
  • Date, Location, Temp/Software: August 2020, Livorno (Italy), 23°C/PixInsight, PhotoShop
  • Click the image for 1920×1080 resolution

NGC6940 and the Veil nebular complex.  This photo was taken on august 2020 by using a filter modified Canon Eos 400D with EF 135 mm lens at f/2.8t on Astrotrac. The photo is the sum of 30 frames, each of 2 minutes. NGC6940 is a rich and large open cluster that lies approximately 2,500 light-years away and near the border between Vulpecula and Cygnus. The Veil nebular complex is what remains visible of a Milky Way star exploded about 9,000 years ago. The Veil nebular complex is physically huge, however, and even though it lies about 1,400 light-years distant, it covers over five times the size of the full Moon. The bright star on the left is Epsilon Cygni.

M11 and Scutum star cloud

  • Telescope: Canon EF 135mm f/2L USM telephoto lens (f/2.8 stopped)
  • Camera: Baader modified Canon 400D, 1600 iso, RAW mode, Optolong PRO filter
  • Mount: Astrotrac with polar scope
  • Integration: 30 x 120 sec, (19 bias, 19 dark, 19 flat)
  • Date, Location, Temp/Software: August 2020, Livorno (Italy), 23°C/MaxIm-DL, PixInsight, PhotoShop
  • Click the image for 1920×1080 resolution

M11 and Scutum star cloud_