Bubble nebula region in Cassiopeia

bubble

  • Telescope: Canon EF 135mm f/2L USM telephoto lens (f/2.8 stopped)
  • CCD Camera: Baader modified Canon 400D, 800 iso, RAW mode
  • Mount: Astrotrac with polar scope
  • Integration: 30 x 120 sec, (21 bias, 21 dark, 21 flat)
  • Date, Location, Temp/Software: August 2012, Grosseto (Italy), 21°C/MaxIm-DL, PixInsight, PhotoShop
  • Click HERE for solved map
  • Click the image for 1920×1080 resolution

Bubble nebula region.  This photo was taken on august 2012 by using a filter modified Canon Eos 400D with EF 135 mm lens at f/2.8 on Astrotrac. The photo is the sum of 30 frames, each of 2 minutes.

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The Tulip nebula in Cygnus

Sadr West

  • Telescope: Canon EF 135mm f/2L USM telephoto lens (f/2.8 stopped)
  • CCD Camera: Baader modified Canon 400D, 800 iso, RAW mode
  • Mount: Astrotrac with polar scope
  • Integration: 30 x 120 sec, (21 bias, 21 dark, 21 flat)
  • Date, Location, Temp/Software: August 2012, Grosseto (Italy), 21°C/MaxIm-DL, PixInsight, PhotoShop
  • Click HERE for solved map
  • Click the image for 1920×1080 resolution

The Tulip nebula (SH2-101).  This photo was taken on august 2012 by using a filter modified Canon Eos 400D with EF 135 mm lens at f/2.8 on Astrotrac. The photo is the sum of 30 frames, each of 2 minutes.

NGC6940 in Vulpecula and the Veil nebular complex in Cygnus

Veil

  • Telescope: Canon EF 135mm f/2L USM telephoto lens (f/2.8 stopped)
  • CCD Camera: Baader modified Canon 400D, 800 iso, RAW mode
  • Mount: Astrotrac with polar scope
  • Integration: 30 x 120 sec, (21 bias, 21 dark, 21 flat)
  • Date, Location, Temp/Software: August 2012, Grosseto (Italy), 22°C/MaxIm-DL, PixInsight, PhotoShop
  • Click HERE for solved map
  • Click the image for 1920×1080 resolution

NGC6940 and the Veil nebular complex.  This photo was taken on august 2012 by using a filter modified Canon Eos 400D with EF 135 mm lens at f/2.8t on Astrotrac. The photo is the sum of 30 frames, each of 2 minutes. NGC6940 (upper right corner) is a rich and large open cluster that lies approximately 2,500 light-years away and near the border between Vulpecula and Cygnus. The Veil nebular complex (bottom center) is what remains visible of a Milky Way star exploded about 9,000 years ago. The Veil nebular complex is physically huge, however, and even though it lies about 1,400 light-years distant, it covers over five times the size of the full Moon. The bright star on the left is Epsilon Cygni.

Cederblad 214 and Sharpless 170 nebulae in Cepheus

cassioneb

  • Telescope: Canon EF 135mm f/2L USM telephoto lens (f/2.8 stopped)
  • CCD Camera: Baader modified Canon 400D, 800 iso, RAW mode
  • Mount: Astrotrac with polar scope
  • Integration: 30 x 120 sec, (21 bias, 21 dark, 21 flat)
  • Date, Location, Temp/Software: August 2012, Grosseto (Italy), 22°C/MaxIm-DL, PixInsight, PhotoShop
  • Click HERE for solved map
  • Click the image for 1920×1080 resolution

Cederblad 214 and Sharpless 170 nebulae.  This photo was taken on august 2012 by using a filter modified Canon Eos 400D with EF 135 mm lens at f/2.8t on Astrotrac. It is the sum of 30 frames, each of 2 minutes. This photo shows two distinctly different nebulae, Cederblad 214 and Sharpless 170.

The nebular complex around Gamma Cygni in Cygnus

Sadr_90

  • Telescope: Canon EF 135mm f/2L USM telephoto lens (f/2.8 stopped)
  • CCD Camera: Baader modified Canon 400D, 800 iso, RAW mode
  • Mount: Astrotrac with polar scope
  • Integration: 30 x 120 sec, (21 bias, 21 dark, 21 flat)
  • Date, Location, Temp/Software: August 2012, Grosseto (Italy), 21°C/MaxIm-DL, PixInsight, PhotoShop
  • Click HERE for solved map
  • Click the image for 1920×1080 resolution

The nebular complex around Gamma Cygni (IC1318) This photo was taken on august 2012 by using a filter modified Canon Eos 400D with EF 135 mm lens at f/2.8 on Astrotrac. The photo is the sum of 30 frames, each of 2 minutes. IC 1318 is one of the brightest nebulas in the Cygnus complex. The bright star in the center of the field is Gamma Cygni, also known as Sadr. Its true location is only 750 light years away and not related to the nebulosity which is much more distant at 5000 light years. There is considerable obscuration of the region due to dusty clouds within the great rift of the Milky Way which attenuates the light of many of the bright stars spread through the region. This region contains many dark nebulae in addition to the emission diffuse nebulae.

Caph and NGC7789 in Cassiopeia

NGC7789

  • Telescope: Canon EF 135mm f/2L USM telephoto lens (f/2.8 stopped)
  • CCD Camera: Baader modified Canon 400D, 800 iso, RAW mode
  • Mount: Astrotrac with polar scope
  • Integration: 30 x 120 sec, (21 bias, 21 dark, 21 flat)
  • Date, Location, Temp/Software: August 2012, Grosseto (Italy), 21°C/MaxIm-DL, PixInsight, PhotoShop
  • Click HERE for solved map
  • Click the image for 1920×1080 resolution

Caph and NGC 7789.  Caph (bottom center), designated Beta Cassiopeiae, is a white-hued star of magnitude 2.3, 54 light-years from Earth.  NGC 7789 (above right) is an open or galactic star cluster about 8,000 light-years distant toward the constellation Cassiopeia and lies near the plane of our Milky Way galaxy. All the stars in the cluster were likely born at the same time but the brighter and more massive ones have more rapidly exhausted the hydrogen fuel in their cores. There are also many fairly bright nebula on this image.

Sharpless nebulae in Cepheus

sh2_140_b

  • Telescope: Canon EF 135mm f/2L USM telephoto lens (f/2.8 stopped)
  • CCD Camera: Baader modified Canon 400D, 800 iso, RAW mode
  • Mount: Astrotrac with polar scope
  • Integration: 30 x 120 sec, (21 bias, 21 dark, 21 flat)
  • Date, Location, Temp/Software: August 2012, Grosseto (Italy), 21°C/MaxIm-DL, PixInsight, PhotoShop
  • Click HERE for solved map

SH2-140.  This photo was taken on august 2012 by using a filter modified Canon Eos 400D with EF 135 mm lens at f/2.8 on Astrotrac. The photo is the sum of 30 frames, each of 2 minutes.