The inner region of the Milk Way with M16 (Eagle nebula) and M17 (Omega nebula)

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  • Telescope: Canon EF 135mm f/2L USM telephoto lens (f/2.8 stopped)
  • Camera: Baader modified Canon 400D, 800 iso, RAW mode, CLS filter
  • Mount: Astrotrac with polar scope
  • Integration: 38 x 120 sec, (25 bias, 25 dark, 25 flat)
  • Date, Location, Temp/Software: August 2019, Livorno (Italy), 24°C/MaxIm-DL, PixInsight, PhotoShop
  • Click the image for 1920×1080 resolution

The inner region of the Milk Way. This photo was taken on august 2019 by using a filter modified Canon Eos 400D with EF 135 mm lens at f/2.8 on Astrotrac. The photo is the sum of 38 frames, each of 2 minutes. M16, the Eagle nebula, is part of a diffuse emission nebula, or H II region, which is catalogued as IC 4703. This region of active current star formation is about 7000 light-years distant. A spire of gas that can be seen coming off the nebula in the northeastern part is approximately 9.5 light-years or about 90 trillion kilometers long. The cluster associated with the nebula has approximately 8100 stars, which are mostly concentrated in a gap in the molecular cloud to the north-west of the Pillars.[6] The brightest star (HD 168076) has an apparent magnitude of +8.24, easily visible with good binoculars. It is actually a binary star formed of an O3.5V star plus an O7.5V companion. This star has a mass of roughly 80 solar masses, and a luminosity up to 1 million times that of the Sun. The cluster’s age has been estimated to be 1–2 million years. M17, the Omega nebula is between 5,000 and 6,000 light-years from Earth and it spans some 15 light-years in diameter. The cloud of interstellar matter of which this nebula is a part is roughly 40 light-years in diameter and has a mass of 30,000 solar masses. The total mass of the Omega Nebula is an estimated 800 solar masses. It is considered one of the brightest and most massive star-forming regions of our galaxy. Its local geometry is similar to the Orion Nebula except that it is viewed edge-on rather than face-on.

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